Genealogy - did you know you could add Photographs now?

August 27, 2013  •  Leave a Comment

If you have never looked into your genealogy I suggest you sign up to Ancestry.com during a free weekend and start tracing your family back.  I traced my family back and found out that not only was my mother’s family one of the first families to settle in Canada in what is now Halifax, Nova Scotia, but that they were also one of the first settlers in Boston, Massachusetts.  Andrew Newcomb, the youngest son in his family was a sea captain from England and sailed to Boston in 1614.  He eventual married and settled down in Boston and became a very prominent member in the community.

This was quite a surprise to me as I was born Canadian and only became a US citizen 3 years after I married my American husband. I am now US Citizen, but to find out that I could also be a member of the Daughter’s of the American Revolution came as a complete surprise to me.  How strange to know this now, maybe it could have saved me time and money in immigration costs.

Some time ago one of my relatives added immigration papers and photographs of my paternal great aunts, and great grandparents and it is wonderful to see similar facial features of one of my sisters or myself in their likeness. There is a photograph of the house my paternal Great, Great Grandfather and his family lived in for many years in England, which still stands today and I have shown to my son.

It makes me wonder what will happen in the years to come.  Will my son be able to show his Grandchildren photographs of me?  Will the digital photographs that we take today still be around 50 years from now?  A hundred years from now?  Will the iPhone photos my clients take today be lost over time?

In my previous career of IT the original hardware I used had a 5-¼ disk drive, then 3 ½ inch disk drives then CD’s and then DVD.  Today you cannot find a device that reads a 5-¼ disk drive or a 3-1/2 inch floppy drive. Hard drive crash all the time. CD readers are getting harder and harder to find. What will happen in 50 years or 100 years?

Will my photography clients of today be able to look at their digital photographs that I take tomorrow?  I am now convinced more then ever that I should insist on printing the best photographs that I take of my clients so that 50 years from now or 100 years from now they will have something to show their grandchildren. 


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